Discovering Quriyat: Hidden Gems and Nature’s Charms in Oman

By: Erin Coyle

Traveling with friends, solo and in group tours, Erin Coyle has explored Southeast and South Asia, Oceania, Europe, the Middle East, East and South Africa. She is currently a freelance travel writer and ESL teacher living in Sur, Oman. Prior to this, she taught English at a university in Nanchang, China for five years.
Discovering Quriyat: Hidden Gems and Nature’s Charms in Oman

Discovering Quriyat: Hidden Gems and Nature’s Charms in Oman

I have been to Quriyat several times but have yet to explore the area. Quriyat has more to see than I was expecting, and after my last stop at the park, I told myself I would return. For those looking for a place to visit in Oman, Quriyat is an excellent choice for a half or full day. A few of my favorites include hiking at Wadi Dayqa, going to the salt pans, stopping at Quriyat Castle, and relaxing at the park. Read more below for some inspiration.

Wadi Dayqa

In addition to kayaking and boating at the dam, visitors can hike at Wadi Dayqa. Enjoy the mountain views, date trees, and glimpses of homes from the wadi, or go through the farms and follow the falaj. The banana and date trees provide shade when walking through the farms. My friend and I walked this easy trail for two hours. We followed the falaj, walked through the village, and ended our walk along the wadi. It gets busy after 10:00 in the morning, so go early to avoid the crowds.

Salt Pans

Follow the coast to reach the salt pans; here, you will find more than three dozen squared pans. The turquoise-colored water in the squares immediately catches your attention upon arrival. Visitors can walk around and take pictures. One man was getting rid of the bad salt in one of the pans, and he said that it takes 25-30 days for salt to be ready. This area is always open, so it’s possible to come here anytime.

Quriyat Castle

Located near the souq, visitors can get a glimpse of life in the past. The children’s room and main bedroom have decorative pillows in bright shades of colorful blues, purples, greens, and oranges. Head to the kitchen to see the clay storage jars and an old coffee grinding machine. I also enjoyed admiring the traditional wooden doors. The cost is 500 baisa for citizens, 1 rial for residents, and 2 rials for non-residents.

Al Buhaira Park

When leaving Quriyat, I noticed an area with dozens of trees and a full parking lot, so I stopped by to see this park. The location is very relaxing because trees and water surround you. There is also a playground for kids and plenty of spots to picnic. I had never heard of this park, so I am glad I went and would return to this spot.

Quriyat is worth visiting to enjoy nature, learn about the past, see some salt pans, and relax at the park. It is a beautiful place to discover and easy to make a day trip.

Author

  • Erin Coyle

    Traveling with friends, solo and in group tours, Erin Coyle has explored Southeast and South Asia, Oceania, Europe, the Middle East, East and South Africa. She is currently a freelance travel writer and ESL teacher living in Sur, Oman. Prior to this, she taught English at a university in Nanchang, China for five years.

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